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Chapter Twenty Two: The Lovely Bones Analysis

Yes, more again. Sorry. Analysis of Sebold’s The Lovely Bones…continuation from previous analytical blogs: see previous here.

~The Analysis (22)~

  • 300 “Unwatched, unloved, unbidden”- almost given as the definition of Harvey. Pitiful impression of the man who killed Susie- reader feels almost guilty for sympathising with him.
  • “I was in Ruth’s eyes…I was looking…I could feel…I felt”- shows Susie’s childlike excitement at being given life one last time. Her marvelling at the sense shows what she doesn’t have in heaven, and what she can’t do. She is living in heaven (in a form) but isn’t really alive- she can’t live through her senses as they can on earth.
  • “I smiled at him one-thousand-watted”- shows the energy she is able to radiate on earth- the power she feels.
  • “…people were throwing rose petals as they saw Ruth Connors”- Symbolism of rose:
  • Love
  • Honor
  • Faith
  • Beauty
  • Balance
  • Passion
  • Wisdom
  • Intrigue
  • Devotion
  • Sensuality
  • Timelessness
  • “Sometimes cats fall ten flights out of the windows of high rises…”- as if falling from heaven was like a cat falling from a window- vulnerable, able, alive.
  • 305 “I could have left this place to claim another. I could have gone anywhere I wanted to”- saddening prospect- the little girl reminiscing over all misses opportunities like an adult that has never grown up. Similar to the way adults point out the things they never did in their lives when thinking about the past, which make it sadder that Susie never got to miss them, she just didn’t have the choice.
  • 306 “Even at the hottest I could make it, I still felt cold”- indication that she is still not fully with Ray, she is still partially dead.
  • “I cupped his elbow in my palm”- significant that the first body part Susie touched was Ray’s elbow- the one part of her that gave an indication of her fate.
  • “…bonfire in the classroom…yelling in the halls as loud as I want”- shows what freedom means to a child like Susie- again references her limited experience
  • “The dark bright pity of being human” 309- oxymoronic – as if being alive isn’t always better than being dead- it is just as dark as bright.
  • 310 “Look what happens when you dream”- change of tone. Seems direct. As if Sebold is making a statement (declarative) directly to readers.
  • “That was how it felt to leave earth the second time”- this time Susie’s death of dignified, peaceful, as if she is receiving some type of justice.


 

Chapter Eighteen: The Lovely Bones Analysis

As with the last chapters- more over-analysed quotes from Sebold’s The Lovely Bones…

~The Analysis (18)~

  • “The old woman that rented the closet liked to listen in, so Ruth tried not to talk much on the phone” 248- Idea that Ruth is trapped in the place she is supposed to feel most safe- her home in the town. Links to the idea of captivity within the rest of the novel. Lonely perception of the old woman: perhaps she felt the need to listen to Ruth talking to her father since no one ever spoke much to her, also the idea she rented her closet suggests that is all the space she had in her house for people to stay- hence presumably not many people stay with her (besides Ruth who doesn’t care where she stayed).
  • “The city had very little to do with her interior life” 249 – suggests she does most of her living on the inside- she lives through her thought and connection with the dead, hence perhaps this is why she makes ‘people nervous’ on the outside- she only lives within, outside she is dead.
  • “You could see the skitter rabbit energy” 249- recurring theme of rabbits- symbolise her vulnerability- Also traditionally, rabbits are associated with fertility, sentiment, desire, and procreation- suggests her desire to be who she really wants to be (sexuality wise?) is a fire that only burns within- she prefers to keep herself to herself…yet people can see through to her soul through her eyes. “People never said anything about her eyes”- is this because they are dead (links to earlier point), or because they have a distaste for what they see?
  • Significance of dressing all in black- doesn’t state this is her uniform- coating herself in the colour of mystery and desire- what she desires to be? Mysterious and desirable?
  • Also interesting how Ruth appears to be linked to Harvey- she ‘makes people nervous’ like her does, she evokes reactions from dogs like he does…
  • “No one knew where she was at any time of the day and no one waited for her. It was an immaculate anonymity” 250 – sense of utter isolation about Ruth- it seems as though she has no one in the world that would miss her if she was to end up in the same state as Susie- yet she never becomes suicidal. Sense of strength about the character of Ruth, as if living along side the dead was giving her the strength and motivation she needed. Anonymous just like Susie’s mother desired to be- she shared links with the family without realising.
  • “Ruth knew her status as a freak at school”- stereotypical high school culture. This label utterly juxtaposes her position as a ‘celebrity’ in heaven. Almost oxymoronic.(pg 250-1). She had no friends in school (besides Ray) yet fans in heaven. Perhaps this is why she associates more with the dead, she can sense an appreciation she doesn’t get from the living.
  • 252 “her ardentness was off-putting”- the fact that people can find Ruth’s positivity conversely negative suggests he doesn’t belong among the living. The people of earth find Ruth strange, and cannot connect with her supposedly ‘human’ emotions- hence perhaps her ‘fans’ in heaven understand what the living don’t.
  • “It was better to look like you were doing something when you stared into the distance” 252- evokes a sense of similarity to Mrs Utemeyer when she was narrated to sit and stare into the distance just as Ruth desires- Utemeyer was ‘part dead’ due to her lack of a brain- perhaps Ruth is too, half dead?
  • “Her journal was her closes and most important relationship”- she can form her closes relationship with something that is not living- again links to the fact that she is not similar to the living, she connects more with the dead, and objects that cannot be classed as alive.
  • “Ruth counted the living just as much as she counted the dead”- shows she just has a natural tendency to connect with the dead, since it is not as if she devotes more time to them, they just come to her.
  • “School librarian…tall, frail woman with wiry hair”- stereotypical school librarian- fact this was Buckley’s favourite teacher shows how he is different- he is similar to Ruth, not chosen first in gym- shows how he has a connection with the dead similar to Ruth (shown when he states Susie talks to him, yet we never get clarification from Susie that she actually does this. Could someone else dead be talking to him?)
  • 254 “…when he was unable to sleep and scanning the few books on gardening that the school library kept”- shows how Buckley is wavering from the stereotypical high school boy, he is doing things not considered ‘cool’- becoming an outsider- just like Ruth and her hobbies were  not stereotypical or cool. “the few…that the library kept” shows how his desires and passions were a minority.
  • “He didn’t like what he read in books”- he has an active mind, just like Ruth when she read books- always wanting more than the pages could offer- reverting to her mind.
  • “…work shed in the garden, where he kept his tools and supplies” 254- evokes an alarming similarity to Ruth- she used to write poetry in her father’s tool shed in the garden and now Buckley is concealing his desires in a tool shed in the garden…foreboding: he will turn out just as ‘freaky’ as Ruth.
  • “The curl up like a hand unfolding”- Buckley describing his tomato plants 255- simile shows how Buckley find them welcoming- again links to Ruth- they find dead objects (or at least, in comparison to a human life- dead) in a way more welcoming than the living.
  • 257- relevant that Jack blacks out when he and Buckley are arguing over Susie? Was it her that caused the heart attack not wanting the relationship between rather and son to deteriorate in front of her eyes? Sensory language (“cold” “damp”) foreshadows the father’s collapse- almost puts the reader in the place of Susie- we know something isn’t right with him and that something will happen, yet Buckley doesn’t. Reader given insight into future just like Susie has.
  • 258 “If he died, I would have him forever” – emphasises again, as in previous chapters, how Susie has maintained her childish desires- shows how she is never growing up.
  • “We stood- the dead child and the living”- the first time Susie seems to acknowledge the fact that she is different to the living. She doesn’t say ‘two children’, she acknowledges that there is a difference between her and her sister which she has previously not done. Shows how she is almost ready to leave earth behind.
  • “air and cover ” “little boy and wounded man” – seems as if the quotation goes a lot deeper than solely speaking of their current situation. As if this is the state they shall remain in forever due to the trauma of Susie’s death- this is what they will both never grow out of. Buckley will remain a small frightened child, and Jack a ‘wounded man’.
  • 260 “I saw the brick paths advancing as I advanced” – physical impossibility- links to fantasy genre- “rending and tearing of time”- again, fantasy genre, defying the physical possibilities of time


 

Chapter Seventeen: The Lovely Bones Analysis

….and even more only-analysed quotations and idea’s from The Lovely Bones, by Alice Sebold.



~The Analysis (17)~

  • “She imagined trees split down the middle and houses on fire” 234- emphasises that, despite the description of Lindsey’s growth at the beginning of the chapter, she was still young, and has the youthful over-active imagination
  • “Old Victorian house”- brings the recurring symbol of houses and buildings- representing protection, a belonging, a future.
  • “more and more of these undeveloped patches were disappearing…that marked my childhood”- life is progressing without Susie- the world is moving on,  her childhood is disappearing only to remain in the minds of those who love her.
  • “We lived in one of the first developments”- sense of roots to that spot, they will forevermore be bound to that area, as if an anchor holds the family to its foundations- where it originated.
  • “I feel like I am in a cave” “It is so quiet in here you can barely hear the rain” – feels as if they were hidden from the other world- perhaps symbolises her desire to be rid of it- childish dream to live away from the world with her ‘one true love’. Hence perhaps she is fantasising, letting her imagination take her to a place that is fitting  with the environment.
  • 236 “It was not longer a Susie-fest on earth”- represents the passing of time, immaturity and youth of Susie- again, childlike self-consideration
  • “…unzip their leathers the lightning stopped and the rumble in the throat of God- that scary thunder- also stopped.” – link to Christianity with reference to God- thunder being described as something from the ‘throat of God’- links to idea of fantasy within the scene
  • 238 “my brother was at the most awkward stage of adolescence- not boy, not man” – sense of lack of identity, of need. Significant that Susie got to watch this- since she herself is neither lady nor girl, she is around the same age, she is neither girl nor woman, but just dead.
  • “Staring at photos of a woman he felt he barely knew anymore” 239 – “A woman” indefinite article shows how he feels he has lost knowledge of her- saddening to think of how the death of one thing had lead to the death of another- Susie’s death lead to the death of their relationship.
  • “Part of what I loved about photography was the power it gave to me over the people on the other side of the camera” 240 – shows how Susie craved authority, she craved power, she craved growing up.
  • “Diving under and up into a mask somehow” “The mask was almost, but not quite, in place”- shows Abigail was trapped by the front she had to put on for her family and her children.
  • “Both of our eyes were open underwater, a new skill- newer for her” 242- rendition from childhood, sense of growing, remembering when Susie was able to experience new things with her Sister in the real world- as if this bit of living aided her sister who was able to run with Samuel using the “skill from the pool”.
  • “Like someone who had survived a gun shot, the wound had been closing, closing- braiding into a scar for eight long years” – “gun shot” emphasises the physical torture- as if the emotion had swelled to such a state it become physically painful- as if it could actually threaten her life. “Scar” shows she will always be affected- always have a mark in her mind of her sister, no matter how vast the time span became. 242
  • 244 “Lindsey and Buckley had come to live their lives in direct proportion to what effect it would have on a fragile father”- almost role reversal- one would expect the father to be making amendments for the children having lost a sibling, the man being the strong one, but it seems the children have taken his place. Note the fricative “fragile father”.
  • “It was Buckley…who saw me” 245- still had a connection to the dead
  • “my face…which had not changed- the hair still parted down the middle…hips undeveloped”- emphasises how Susie is stationary beside the fast paced progression of the world
  • “I could hear the voices of those who no longer lived on earth” 246- as if many were like Susie-Obsessed with keeping a hold on the living but never quite being able to hold them- always having someone to watch even if they had misinterpreted their own significance. Idea of longing, having someone on  earth with which to belong to- an anchor.
  • “the sound of life”- as if, since she is no longer living- it is only her senses through which she can live- through witnessing the progression of her family, hearing the ‘sound of life’
  • “Recognising the tension of that moment when the world in the bottle depended, solely, on me”- hint that Susie is understanding the benefits of letting go of her grip on earth. She is beginning to evoke a sense of maturity again, as if, she can grow in mind if not in body. She is becoming less selfish- she understands the living must be left to leave their grief and move on.


 

Chapter Fifteen: The Lovely Bones Analysis

As before, crazily analysed quotes from Sebold’s The Lovely Bones. I apologise in advance for the essay…

~The Analysis (15)~

  • 188 “Getting caught became another moment of his life that brought fear- that sick feeling…like eggs being folded in a bowl”- here it is noticeable the reference to casual domestic life when in contrast to the seriousness of the subject. Perhaps this quote gives reason for Harvey’s skill of covering the evidence of his murders- he had done it form a child- out of force, sense of duty to his mother, not choice.
  • “You have to be able to look passed the dead’ his mother said” – as if nothing of his personality we know of as evil and unjust in the book was his choice. He was (and still is) solely a little boy obeying the desires of his equally as lost mother. “Sometimes there are good trinkets to take away from them”- he followed this instruction also.
  • 189 “Do you want the eye or the heart”? … The eye” – Harvey choose to keep the trinket of the eye over the heart- perhaps symbolises his insecurity- an ‘eye’ represents nerves, as if he was constantly on the look out, constantly aware- he had no capacity for love.
  • 190 “he had a moment of clarity about how life should be lived: not as a child nor as a woman. They were to two worst things to be” – as if killing made him either a man or  a boy- it was the only way he knew to avoid becoming a woman or a child (perhaps symbolic of weakness?). Or perhaps he will trying to rid the world pf what he thought were ‘the worst things to be’. Making the world a ‘cleaner, nicer place’.
  • “Take action only after calculating the worst possible outcome” 190- Harvey was the best practised criminal in every way- it was how he had been brought up- the only way he knew to live.
  • 192 “evidence of what they look to be extreme loneliness and a room full of beautiful dolls houses”- the fact they found evidence of his loneliness suggests the extent of it…this makes it seem strange that he could so willingly kill those he brought home, rather then embrace the company he do desperately needed. The significance of the dolls houses: just like a dolls house represents an individual life, he could be building all the lives he could have had, all the families he has lost, keeping them with him, if not in reality.
  • 195 Len taking Abigail to the “filtration system or the water plumbing plant”- all of their encounters have been based around the site of something functional- a filtration system, a fan- perhaps suggesting that their embraces are also only functional- they serve a purpose just s the fan or the system- to help Abigail forget.
  • 195 “I could drown in those eyes Abigail” – again, recurring motif of water, waves, the ocean, drowning. As if the inside of her was so vast and unreachable- the more you spent time with her, the less you understood.
  • 196 “the foreign territory enough to soothe her” “feeling of being unreachable”- she wanted nothing more than to be someone she never had- she is finally achieving her desires of freedom- juxtaposition shows her sorry state of mind, she finds comfort in loosing herself.
  • “My mother had my body as it would never become” – clarity and reemphasis on the fact that Susie will never grow up.


 

Chapter Thirteen: The Lovely Bones Analysis

It’s in the title really- more elaborate and some rather metaphorically and emotionally ‘deep’ interpretations…

~The Analysis (13)~

  • •”The rumours…wove in and out of the student’s lockers like the most persistent of snakes” 156– reference to ‘snakes’ could simply be referring to the evil connotations of the animal, emphasising on a basic level the evil nature of the rumours compared to the innocence of Lindsey (and supposedly her father)- links to genre of fantasy (good vs evil). Snakes also have reference to Christianity in the Garden of Eden, from which the connotations of evilness and chaos are evoked:
  • The interplay between the serpent and Eve in the Garden of Eden counts among the best-known examples of snakes as symbols of temptation. In this example, the snake’s cunning entices Eve to eat the forbidden fruit, unleashing sin and chaos into the world. However, this imagery is not limited to only the Christian Bible. Snakes in Mesopotamian and Egyptian cultures also symbolized chaos.

  • Snakes also refer to a sense of threat, hence it could be symbolising the threat these rumours pose to Lindsey’s otherwise calm exterior (managed through her emotionless outlook)- and hence the temptation to do what she feels she shouldn’t (link to garden of Eden) and loose control. Lockers also symbolise secrecy, as if the threats are threatening Lindsey’s secrecy, the fact that she really is not fine at all.
  • “using my father’s debasement as a varnish of cool they could coat themselves with” – links to idea throughout novel of wanting to be someone other than that who you are (e.g. Abigail wants to be free of motherhood, Len wants to be free of responsibilities & guilt)- Clarissa and Brian want to be cooler than they are accepted to be. Verb “Varnish” links to desire to conceal what is not desirable.
  • “everyone I’d known was growing up”- links to novel’s genre as Bildungsroman, sad truth that she will never grow up.
  • 157 “Buckley went…to borrow in the empty cave of my father’s heart”- caves connote mystery, safety, sanctuary- otherwise a cave symbolises something cold and unfeeling, juxtaposing the feeling one would expect a man to have who has children- could suggest how Jack also has the desire to be someone other than the warm and feeling father he is supped to
  • 158 “Which she washed. Which she folded. Which she ironed…” repetition of ‘which she’ emphasises the monotony of the mother’s life. Seeks to explain to the reader why she despises it so much, desires freedom. Elaborated on by sentence following it saturated with connectives, both complex and a compound sentence- elongates the everlasting, tedious impression of life for Abigail. Makes reader empathise with her rather than hate her when she thinks of Len three lines below.
  • “How odd he might look to an outsider or to my mother” 158 – suggestion of linking Abigail to an outsider, almost defining her as an outsider by placing the noun ‘mother’ after outsider- possible to trace Jack’s thought process: from outsider, to his wife
  • “they wanted him to shut all signs of his grief away, place it in a file somewhere and tuck it in a drawer, so that no one would be asked to open it again” 159- irony of making an abstract noun seem tangible (goes against the definition), emphasises extent of Jack’s grief- it had almost compounded into a physical object
  • 160 “How to swim back to her…she was pulling and pulling away” – recurring motif of the sea, and the movement of sides- ‘pulling and pulling away’ makes Abigail seem like an anchored boat- wanting to drift away but not being able to- tugging on the string that ties her to the ground. As if their whole world was underwater- suffocating.
  • 160 “If my father fell, only a dog and a boy who loved him would see” – we see the other side to Jack, less of the masculine, family supporting figure and more of the vulnerable, scared man he really is.
  • 161 (another rendition of Abigail’s monotonous life) “the towels my mother bleached, the towels my mother hung…the towels she folded”- sense of insignificance about the mother’s life- it is one string of folding towels
  • 162 “Abigail should be doing this” (with regards to fetching things for Lindsey helping her shave her legs”- Stereotypical and unjustified
  • 163 “A fine trickle of blood beginning to spread into the white foam” contrast between blood red and white links to the description of Susie’s skin ‘that had never seen the sun’ and the blood that spilled from her with Harvey’s knife- blood is wholly symbolic
  • 165 “my corpse cut up,  my blank rotting eyes” – gruesome imagery, gothic tone within the novel
  • “The anchor houses…because the anchored the neighbourhood to an original road” 168/9- sense of belonging, sense of a base, a foundation on which to build lives
  • “do you know how alone I have always felt…my mother asked her mother”- the juxtaposition between the formality of the nomination “mother” and the hint of personal revelation in the subject- shows that things are changing, they are growing just like everyone else.
  • “She had never understood places like this- places where her own child had chosen to live” (With reference to living in houses ‘identical in structure’ to another- emphasises how Lynn views being different as a way of life, the prospect of being similar to another person is unrecognisable to her, in-understandable. 170
  • “I’m not involved with anyone. Her mind flew like a bird from one rooftop to the next”- The simile symbolises freedom, like with Len she had she freedom she always desired outside of her role in motherhood- she can finally be free of responsibility and judgement. Proven by “The pragmatic, prim mistress that my mother had always been had gone”
  • “Fireflies gathering in a swarm above his front flower beds” 172 (regarding the signs Lynn witnessed to tell her Harvey was a killer- Fireflies symbolize guidance most obvious sign
  • “The girl was being burned alive, but first, there had been her body, clean and whole” 173 – strange that Abigail refers to this as a “wonderful dream”- as if a death doesn’t remove the fact that they existed initially- hence perhaps this is Abigail coming to accept the death of her daughter- to accept what she was before, not what she was not afterwards.


 

Chapter Nine: The Lovely Bones Analysis

Another fusillade of ‘brief’ literary analysis…which will inevitably end up being a full-blown essay at the hands of my overly obsessive self.

Either way…

Chapter nine ~the analysis~

  1. “My parents were like sleepwalkers” pg 98~ non-desirable representation of parents, almost scary, gothic-like representation. Emphasises lack of conscience, as if a part of their strength and will died alongside Susie. Amplifies devastation. JUXTAPOSITION: sleep is associated with peace, which parents are clearly not experiencing.
  2. “A miscalculated circling, a sad, partnerless dance” pg 99 ~ (describing Lynn’s attempts to understand her daughter)~ pessimistic view of life- if a mother cannot understand their own child after so many years, what hope is there for anyone else. Isolated view of life, as if a man is confined by human nature, we are all fundamentally ‘sad’ and ‘partnerless’. METAPHOR for life? JUXTAPOSITION between connotations of dance and defined sadness and isolation. Complex sentence structure links to indication of the complexity of life- the need for ‘calculation’ and the fact more often than not it is ‘miscalculated’
  3. “She was, in all her obnoxious finery, dragging the light back in” pg 100 ~ (regarding the fact it is surprising and unforeseen that Lynn, as mad as she is portrayed, could bring good to such a dismal situation) ~ very interesting on a literal level ~ “light” = abstract noun (a noun that isn’t tangible), yet the metaphor “dragging” with regards to the light makes it sound deliberately tangible. Hence to read the clause sounds as absurd and ridiculous as the subject of the sentence- the idea of dragging light is just as strange as Lynn bringing it in.
  4. “The makeup brought out the blue of her eyes” (Linsdey)~ evokes a sense of similarity to her mother’s ‘ocean eyes’  103~ sense of foreboding, as if she is to become as personally lost and engulfed in a life she doesn’t want as her mother is now.
  5. “Like gems imported from some far-off place where the colours were richer than the colours in our house had ever been.” 103  (describing Lindsey’s new make-up facial features)~ complexity of sentence along with the linguistic choices make the clause sound almost poetic- links to sense of tranquillity and harmony within the mind of Lindsey as she inspects herself in the mirror. Lindsey’s self appreciation juxtaposes her previous lack of self-opinion. Wouldn’t previously even look in the mirror.
  6. “I wanted to snake up my father’s back, circle in his neck, whisper in his ear” 109 ~ use of snake is significant- connotes threat and danger, yet it is assumable Susie is implying an act of comfort. Perhaps this is how the Salmons view the world around them: kindness and contact is threatening, it is dangerous and scary since this type of contact grows less common as the family detonates. “But I was already there in his every pore and crevice” ~gothic tone.


(Chapter 8 I omitted from the analysis since it is such a short chapter. Following chapters to come.)

Chapter Seven: The Lovely Bones Analysis

This book forms part of my studies for (surprise surprise:) English…hence since I seem to be rebelling again the idea of a theme within this blog, I thought I’d add a bit of analysis within it. Why not. *refrains from using abbreviated hashtags*.

 


 

Side note of significance: The recurring theme of rabbits…in terms of symbolism, it generally goes as follows-

Symbolic rabbit meanings deal primarily with abundance, comfort, and vulnerability. Traditionally, rabbits are associated with fertility, sentiment, desire, and procreation. Rabbit meanings are also closely linked to the seasons, the changes of Mother Earth, and specifically Springtime.

In the previous chapter the rabbits become apparent for the second time- they sought out the gloves of Susie’s left by Lindsey. They “investigated” them. This could be Sebold juxtaposing two things: Susie (symbolised by the gloves), and the rabbits. The rabbits (as noted above) are representative of comfort, fertility, desire, procreation- all of the thing Susie can never have and will never be. Thus perhaps the rabbits represent all that Susie can never have, or they may highlight how far from them she is, in both body and spirit. On a literal level, she if far away. And spiritually, she is too, since she is a ghost and they are living- in two different worlds.


Alright…now onwards with chapter seven: things to point out-

  1. “Like everyone else I was trying to protect him (Buckley)”- he is trapped in his youth and is isolated by the lack of knowledge this brings him. The good of others is isolating him. pg 91
  2. “graphic prints meant to stimulate children” – indication into the lack of parenting- pictures replace the attention parents were supposed to give. pg 92
  3. “Lindsey would tell the night that she had to move on”pg 92 – ironic since this was exactly her coping strategy when she lost Susie. As if she had already grieved/ developed a method before even knowing what would happen. Foreboding? (Since Susie acted as the dead knight…and she was the one who actually died.)
  4. “there was a hole…. inside things I didn’t want anyone else to see” pg 93- here develops the recurring motif of a hole, especially for the purpose of hiding things (in Susie’s case it was her personal objects, in Harvey’s, is was his desire (to kill)). It could be giving a false sense of hope: Susie’s hole beneath her bed was where she kept things she wanted no one to see, yet they were found. Is this Sebold suggesting that what was inside Harvey’s hole beneath the ground will too be discovered?
  5. there is the “stained and bloody twig” that almost killed Buckley. It is ironic that something so insignificant and small (not even a branch or a stick, it is a ‘twig’) could (on the juxtaposing side) cause so much damage. Reader can almost imagine the twig in Buckley’s throat- horrific imagery. pg 93
  6. “Painting toenails” “glitter” “seventeen”- lexical field of youth and glamour- juxtaposes the blood and gory nature of what it so come for Buckley. Also juxtaposes the lack of elegance in Susie’s death. pg 93
  7. “A breeze came up, blowing the fringe on my cutoffs against my thighs”- pathetic fallacy- using the weather to express a calm, tranquil mood. Almost synaesthesia- as if the breeze was audible and the fringe tickling her legs was a sense of touch. pg 94
  8. “Swung” “ran” “slid down the banister” “jumped…the fence”- semantic field of heroism. Scene of saviour.
  9. “Buckley was choking. His body bucking”…strange coincidence that his near death experience sounds similar to the name his parents gave him? Hint at the fate of live? pg 94
  10. When Lynn suggests Susie will have a long life, Susie notes “as usual…was wrong”. As if Susie should of known then that she was not to live a full life. As if when Lynn said something it was always wrong, hence she should have expected to die. Suggestion of a series of clues leading up to her death. Fate? pg 94
  11. “Wow, Nate said…marvelling at how over time red blood turned black” – mimics the scene with Harvey holding the knife he used to kill Susie. Foreboding? pg 94
  12. “Crows were lined up, their beaks holding crooked twigs”. Take note of the symbolism of crows: they’re cunning, symbolise death, war, sign of change (e.g. new beginning / impending death. Could it be relevant there is the mention of a “widow” a few lines prior, and a few chapters on Susie’s grandfather joins her in heaven, presumably leaving someone a “widow” on earth? Hence the impending death may seem insignificant to the reader, but when analysed it could be a clue.